bio

Kimberly White is the perpetually amused mother of some very theatrical children, and the lucky wife of the funniest person she’s ever known. Her nine months of research for The Shift included dozens of hours working alongside nursing home employees in offices, showers, vans, patient rooms, kitchens, and one very creepy basement.

She was raised in a boisterous and opinionated family of eight children, where you had to eat quickly and talk loudly or risk being starved and forgotten (sorry Rachel). Every summer the entire brood would travel to her grandfather’s farm to run wild with an anarchic horde of cousins and a spiteful herd of llamas. It was the kind of magical childhood people write books about, and maybe someday she will.

Kimberly earned a degree in philosophy, studying under C. Terry Warner and serving as his longtime research assistant. She was editor of her department’s undergraduate philosophy journal and copy editor for Epoche: A Journal for the History of Philosophy. She has also worked for the Arbinger Institute as a group instructor and as a first-draft editor of Leadership and Self-Deception.

She and her husband, Zachary, spent about two years in England being deliriously happy and then eleven years in New York City being deliriously crowded. They recently moved from Harlem to the village of Pawnee, Illinois, where they have gloried in mid-western sunsets and accumulated pets at an alarming rate.

 

 

© 2018, Kimberly White, All Rights Reserved

Kimberly White spent 12 years paying preposterous Manhattan rent in order to take her five children to free museums, but recently relocated to a small farm town in Illinois to avoid city crowds and focus on writing. She is a certified Arbinger Institute presenter,  former longtime research assistant to Arbinger founder C. Terry Warner, and was a first-draft editor of Leadership and Self-Deception.

Her nine months of research for The Shift took her to more than two dozen nursing homes in three states, where she logged hundreds of hours observing and interviewing nursing home employees and patients in offices, showers, vans, patient rooms, kitchens, and one very creepy basement. This is her first book.